Just Like New Kids

Just Like New is an incredible children’s consignment event which gives the very best services available to both consignor’s and shoppers. We pride ourselves on being the most organized sale in Pennsylvania. All items are clearly labeled and placed in specific sections so you can easily find the size, gender and items that you are seeking for. Our computerized inventory, friendly workers, and efficiency, help make us the best! Try us for excellent quality and affordable prices. We would love to serve you and your family!

Our consignors love to quickly enter their items online. And they track their sales online during the event. It is fast, easy and fun! Consignor checks are ready in 14 days! All your items are neatly sorted and ready for you at pick up. It “Just” doesn’t get any easier!

Since we focus on quality, shoppers get a great selection-and the prices are affordable for families in search of bargains!

Come discover Just Like New, it will be the event you will never miss again! WHY CONSIGN WITH JLN? You set the price! You are in complete control of how much your items sell for. You decide if you want your items discounted. You receive 70% of the selling price! This is much better than the 40/60 split most consignment stores offer. Your check arrives within 14 days! Your items will be viewed by hundreds of people during the best consignment sale in Central Pennsylvania. We bring the larger shopping audience to you!

Check the website for the next sales event and location!

Consignor Registration is open! Visit our website for registration information.

No time to consign? Want to shop the preview sale? Volunteer to work a shift and shop before the consignors!

We are very pleased to announce that First Time Moms & Dads and Grandparents get to shop the Just Like New Preview Sale, right after the volunteers, consignors and our wonderful sponsors as our guest! This sale allows first time parents (expecting, adopting or mothers of a first child) the chance to enjoy our pre-sale. All first time parents must pre-register for this sale.

We look forward to seeing You soon!

1561 Holly Pike ( Rt. 34)
Carlisle, PA 17013
717-486-8737

Gallop Country

Gallop Country was started in 2011 in the midst of the great recession. The idea was to create a place to serve the horseback riding and horse loving community through making it possible for riders to buy quality consigned horse related equipment, apparel and gifts, and for people to consign items that they no longer used. We felt that this would help people keep doing what they loved for less money.

We also have tried hard to find good value new items for the store and website. We have found many locally made items such as gifts and cards. We hope to find more.

Most of all we hope to create a friendly atmosphere that will bring the horse community together. Yes we have  a business, but first we are horse people just like our customers.

Gallop Country
900 Cavalry Road
Carlisle, PA 17013
717-386-5015

Michael Lynn Shatto Foundation

The mission of the Michael Lynn Shatto Foundation is to research, cultivate and build programs that assist and educate those who are burdened by mental health issues, chemical dependency or domestic violence – both physical and psychological. The institution supports individuals and organizations that embrace the foundation’s ideals and principals.

239 York Road
Carlisle, PA 17013
(717) 243-4666

Oaktree Environmental Services

In 2007, former US Army veterans, John New and Steve Kreis, recognized the need for improving the quality of services available to the public in the area of wastewater treatment and hauling. Armed with the knowledge and experience of providing great customer service, they set out to form a strong brand that stood for loyalty and integrity.

In 2008, Oaktree Environmental Services, Inc. was formed and began acquiring and consolidating small, family-run septic and portable restroom companies with the goal of providing great, consistent service at a fair price.

From 2008-2012, Oaktree has seen consistent growth and provided jobs – bucking the industry trend. Being a veteran-owned organization, Oaktree gives back to the community veteran organizations through free and discounted services. We also support local youth programs and schools.

In 2011, Oaktree Environmental Services opened its second office in Newport, PA to offer Perry County residents the same great service that Cumberland County residents have come to rely on. Oaktree attributes its continued success to providing great service at a fair price.

Oaktree Environmental Services is a full-service provider of septic system services including tank cleaning, repairs and installation. We also sell and rent the cleanest portable restrooms available for your events.

Thank you to our customers for their support over the last four years as we have strived to exceed your standards for customer service.

298 McAllister Church Rd. Suite D
Carlisle, PA 17015
717-249-5056

Carlisle Arts Learning Center

The Carlisle Arts Learning Center (CALC) was founded in 1992 to encourage creativity and self-esteem through exploration and appreciation of the visual arts. The non-profit art center opened inside a three-story building at 19 N. Hanover St. in August 1998.

The 1912 building is located in Carlisle’s downtown historic district. CALC now offer classes and workshops in five main areas: ceramics, drawing, painting, photography, copper enameling and arts-and-crafts,” Morgenthal says. “We have courses for children, teens, and adults.” CALC instructors are experienced art educators or working artists themselves. Many classes are geared for beginners. Course fees are based on the number of hours of instruction.

Many area Scout troops, home schoolers, and church groups have scheduled customized workshops at CALC. Groups can arrange single or multiple sessions in clay, photography, or a variety of arts-and-crafts. Three weeks notice is usually required to make arrangements for these events.

In addition to the classes and workshops, CALC volunteers host open studios each week in clay and photography — from 6 to 9 p.m. Mondays and Tuesdays, and from 1:30 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. on Saturdays and Sundays.

Another facet of CALC’s mission is fulfilled through its art exhibit programming in it’s art gallery.  Six or seven shows are slated each year, and most feature works created by mid-state artists. Sculpted wood, paintings, pastels, basketry, ceramics, copper enameling, wildlife carvings, photography, and dolls are just a few of the media that have been showcased at CALC in recent years.

For further information about any of CALC’s programs, the annual Benefit Art Auction, or other activities, call the CALC message line, 717-249-6973, or visit the CALC website, www.carlislearts.org.

The Marketing of Carlisle : Part I

The Marketing of Carlisle : Part I

by Charlie Andrews

Prologue

A town is a living thing that has an identity, spirit and personality that makes the community unique and alive. Towns are old enough to have seen generations grow, walk their streets, live their lives and pass on. The town itself continues on. This is what gives a town special meaning in our lives. Changes occur, of course, but the essence of the town remains the same. The essence of Carlisle is its downtown, the face and heart of our community. Downtown Carlisle is beautiful, historic, and has a core of unique shops, galleries, antique stores, an art center, a performing arts center, lodging and restaurants. Carlisle overall is an economically diverse town with three colleges, that is growing culturally, intellectually and socially. It has tremendous (yet unrealized) potential.

In the 27 years I have made my living here in the downtown, I have worked alongside fellow merchants, other businesspeople and public officials for the betterment of Carlisle and its downtown.

Today, however, those efforts are no longer moving Carlisle forward. We are slipping into decline. If this decline is allowed to continue, more downtown storefronts will become offices, converted into residences, or increasingly occupied by less-than-credible merchants. I know that this sounds over the top, but I would suggest that it isn’t, and the process has already begun.

We have reached the point of diminishing returns with our current marketing programs as they are currently designed and funded. Complacency has set in as infrastructure ages and economic factors shift. In the mean time, new economic dynamics begin to present opportunities, brought upon by the recent revitalization of our existing malls.

Why is the downtown so important? It is a vital economic factor to Carlisle and the surrounding area that it serves. It is our county seat, an important crossroads and our most significant image of our community to the world. Can we survive without it? Yes, but only as the suburbs of the greater Harrisburg/West Shore area.

To counter this decline, Carlisle must present itself to the world as the unique, beautiful, historic and interesting town that it is. It must do this creatively, energetically, and head on. Carlisle ranks with the Georgetowns and New Hopes of the world, and it needs to show it. This would be the marketing of Carlisle.

Go to Part II

Image Credit: Wonderlane

Molly Pitcher

Molly Pitcher
As Americans began writing their history in the 1800s, they searched for heroes and heroines symbolizing America’s spirit and character. George Washington became “The Father of Our Country.” And America’s Revolutionary War heroine? Molly Pitcher. Bits and pieces of actual people and events, along with half truths and embellishments, evolved into the Molly Pitcher Legend that has been handed down from generation to generation.

The Legend:
On June 28, 1778, Continental and British troops clashed at the Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey. Reported as “one of the hottest days ever known,” soldiers dying of heat and thirst welcomed the sight of Mary Hays, wife of an artillery soldier, as she repeatedly brought water to the exhausted and wounded men. They nicknamed her Molly Pitcher. (Afterwards, any woman bringing water to soldiers on the field, was called “Molly Pitcher.”)

As the battle raged, Molly’s husband was wounded while manning his cannon. Molly rose to the occasion by picking up the rammer and servicing the cannon through out the remainder of the battle. Her heroic efforts were recognized by George Washington himself (as some stories claim) and by the State of Pennsylvania.

Carlisle’s Molly Pitcher:

The Basics
Mary Hays McCauley (McKolly or McCalla or McCawley or McAuley) was born c1753 and married William Hays. William was a gunner in Proctor’s 4th Artillery at the Battle of Monmouth during the American Revolution, and Mary, like many women, followed her husband to war. After the War, William, Mary, and their 3-year-old son, John L. Hays, settled in Carlisle purchasing lot #257. William entered the barbering business. William died in 1786 and by 1793 Mary married John McCalla, who dies or disappears by 1810. In 1822 Mary Hays McCauley applied for a pension from the State of Pennsylvania and was granted a yearly $40 pension by special act of the PA legislature. The initial bill, Senate No. 265, was entitled “An act for the relief of Molly McKolly, a widow of a soldier of the Revolutionary War.” Striking “widow of a soldier” and inserting “for services rendered” was a deliberate change to the bill and Mary thus received the pension in her own right. Molly and her son continued to live in Carlisle until her death in 1832. Mary Hays McCauley is referred to as Mary, Molly, and Polly in various tax and other records. Although oral accounts have been passed down that Mary Hays actually took her husband’s place at the cannon after he was injured at the Battle of Monmouth, there is no documentation – as yet – that she really did this.

Mixing it up
Also in Cumberland County at the time of the Revolutionary War, just north of Chambersburg,
(now Franklin County) was Mary Corbin. Known as Captain Molly, she fought at the Battle of Washington in 1776 and documentation verifies her firing a cannon and being wounded during that battle. She also received a pension in her own right. She is buried at West Point.

Was she the original Molly Pitcher?
FYI: Other women were also granted pensions for their services during the American Revolution by special act of the PA Legislature.

Does it matter?
Whether Carlisle’s Mary Hays McCauley or Margaret Corbin, visiting the Molly Pitcher Monument in Carlisle’s Old Graveyard is worth the visit to pay respects to all women who followed their loved ones to war and made heroic sacrifices in the cause of Independence – on and off the field of battle.

Compliments of Carlisle Guided Tours * Walking Tours of Carlisle * (717) 249-2926 (Not sure if they are in business now)

References:
Thompson, D.W. and Schaumann, Merri Lou. “Goodbye, Molly Pitcher,” Cumberland County History, Vol. 6, Number 1, Carlisle, PA, Cumberland County Historical Society,1989.

Echman, Walter. Program script on the history of the Carlisle Carpet Co., 1964.

Hoffer, Ann Kramer. Twentieth Century Thoughts-Carlisle: The Past Hundred Years, Carlisle, PA, Cumberland County Historical Society, 2002.