Carlisle Borough

Carlisle Borough

This is the official Carlisle Borough website. You can find a brief history and community focus of Carlisle.

There is a bit of information on the site – but it is not all linked from the main pages. My suggestion is to use the search box for page results. However, browsing the site does present some interesting information.

Photo Expressions Terry Blain

Photo Expressions Terry Blain

Family PhotoshootI am Terry Blain, a Master Photographer from the Carlisle, PA area.  I began my career over two decades ago.  I have attended Harrisburg Area Community College, Triangle Institute of Professional Photography, became a member of the Professional Photographers Association of Pennsylvania, Inc. in 1992.  I was awarded a PA degree in 2012 and in 2013 I received my degree of Master of Photography.  I am continuously working to advance my   education so that I can provide my customers the highest standards in the photography industry.

The Marketing of Carlisle : Part II

by Charlie Andrews

Some History

In the 1970’s the only efforts to market Carlisle were by the merchants themselves. For many years they met once a month for a breakfast meeting at the old Bellaire House Restaurant, first as the Central Carlisle Business Association then as the Downtown Business Association. Essentially, the marketing efforts were of group advertising in the local newspapers and radio, holiday specials, and a one big annual event, “Sidewalk Sales” in July. The effect of two malls on the edges of Carlisle had already wrought dramatic change in the downtown (and in downtowns across America). Stores like Montgomery Wards, Penney’s, The Bon-Ton, Wengers, etc., moved to the malls. The downtown still had a lot to offer in its owner-operated stores and restaurants within a beautiful and historic downtown setting.

It was obvious, however, that marketing efforts needed to be increased to attract new businesses and people. We needed a person who was paid to work on these efforts constantly and consistently, rather than relying on volunteer merchants who already had a lot to do just running their businesses.

In 1980, the Carlisle Chamber of Commerce, under the leadership of then president Len Doran, proposed the formation of an organization and the hiring of an individual whose job would be to coordinate existing marketing efforts and develop new ones. They would create new opportunities to celebrate Carlisle and bring outside people to the downtown. There would be a board of directors with regular meetings, and various committees would be developed for events, beautification of the downtown, economic development, membership, etc. Initially, the Chamber of Commerce and the Borough each contributed money toward a matching grant from the state’s Department of Community Affairs (today called the Department of Community and Economic Development). The grant was made for each of three years, and after that the state grant ended. Local businesses and industries were also solicited and donated over $25,000. The idea was that after the grant ended, Carlisle would see the benefits of the program and continue to support it.

In Carlisle’s case, we did, but a number of communities across Pennsylvania didn’t. Many essentially lost their downtowns as far as economic effectiveness or meaning to their communities. Carlisle’s program, started in 1981, was initially called the Carlisle Economic Development Center. Today it is called the Downtown Carlisle Association (DCA).

Since its formation, the DCA has continued to develop group advertising ideas, new events (Octubafest, Street Hoops, Corvette Parade, etc.), financial assistance programs for facades and signage, and new marketing tools in the form of a Carlisle brochure and video, etc. Originally the goal was to draw people from the surrounding local areas to Carlisle. As the years have gone on though, it has became apparent that for Carlisle to really thrive and prosper, we need to draw people to Carlisle from out of the area, i.e. Baltimore, Washington D.C., Philadelphia, northern Virginia, etc. At the same time, we also need to attract competent merchants to the downtown.

Other, positive developments in the downtown have been the Carlisle Theater, the downtown hotel, and the parking garage as well as the Carlisle Arts Learning Center and the expansion of the Cumberland County Historical Society. Additionally, we are seeing the redevelopment of the old Woolworth’s building and the fire ravaged properties on the corner of High and Pitt Streets.

From the DCA’s beginning in 1981 and into the 1990’s, Carlisle had turned its downtown around and improved it significantly.

Go to Part III

Dolly’s Wash House

Dolly’s is a coin laundry conveniently located in Carlisle. Only three blocks from the Carlisle Fairgrounds and minutes from Dickinson College and the Historic Downtown. Dolly’s is clean and convenient with plenty of off street parking and affordable prices (a change machine is available). Vending, refreshments and cable TV are available while you wait.

725 N Hanover Street
Carlisle, PA 17013
717.258.1955

The Residences at Seven Gables

The Residences at Seven Gables is a brand new upscale apartment community offering contemporary amenities and features unlike anyplace else in Carlisle, PA.  You‘ll enjoy unprecedented access to everywhere in and around southcentral PA.

We’re ideally located near I-83, Route 15 and the PA Turnpike for easy commuting to work, shop and play in nearby Harrisburg, Dillsburg, Shippensburg, and Boiling Springs.

Take a plunge into the resort-style pool or kickback on the sundeck.

The elegant clubhouse is great for entertaining and is available for private functions.  There’s a state-of-the-art fitness center and a full service business center to help you stay connected.

The Residences at Seven Gables is professionally managed by Lincoln BP Management, Inc., you’ll enjoy benefits such as 24-hour emergency maintenance and lock out service, beautifully landscaped grounds and snow removal.  The on-site managers are dedicated to taking care of the details so you can just relax in your distinctive apartment home.

The Residences at Seven Gables
1 Rush Drive
Carlisle, PA 17013
717-243-7705

The Marketing of Carlisle : Part V

by Charlie Andrews

Carlisle’s Potential

Carlisle is already a destination for the local area, but it is the potential day-trippers within a two-hour driving radius who put a tremendous amount of disposable income within reach of our community. This means more people coming to Carlisle for all the right reasons, to shop, partake of our cultural events, to establish businesses and even to live in the proposed renovated areas of our downtown. For this to happen Carlisle must market itself.

Downtown Carlisle is a destination for:
• Antiques • Art • Crafts
• Specialty Shops • Fine Dining • Boutiques
• History • Architecture • Entertainment
• Cultural Events • Fine Hotels • Bed & Breakfasts
• Books • Baking/Desserts

Additionally, Carlisle’s fine lodging in its downtown allows visitors to take in not only Carlisle but surrounding historic and scenic areas. Some other attractions to people from outside our area are:

• Carlisle Car Shows • Area Civil War Sites
• Cumberland County Historical Society • Local/Area Museums • Dickinson College
• Famous Trout Streams
• US Army War College • Historic Colleges
• Dickinson School of Law

Some Allies of Carlisle
who also have a mutual interest in the health of our community are:
• Area Industries • Carlisle Productions
• Dickinson College
• Law School • US Army War College • Wal-Mart
• Lowes • Home Depot

Go to Part VI

Molly Pitcher

Molly Pitcher
As Americans began writing their history in the 1800s, they searched for heroes and heroines symbolizing America’s spirit and character. George Washington became “The Father of Our Country.” And America’s Revolutionary War heroine? Molly Pitcher. Bits and pieces of actual people and events, along with half truths and embellishments, evolved into the Molly Pitcher Legend that has been handed down from generation to generation.

The Legend:
On June 28, 1778, Continental and British troops clashed at the Battle of Monmouth, New Jersey. Reported as “one of the hottest days ever known,” soldiers dying of heat and thirst welcomed the sight of Mary Hays, wife of an artillery soldier, as she repeatedly brought water to the exhausted and wounded men. They nicknamed her Molly Pitcher. (Afterwards, any woman bringing water to soldiers on the field, was called “Molly Pitcher.”)

As the battle raged, Molly’s husband was wounded while manning his cannon. Molly rose to the occasion by picking up the rammer and servicing the cannon through out the remainder of the battle. Her heroic efforts were recognized by George Washington himself (as some stories claim) and by the State of Pennsylvania.

Carlisle’s Molly Pitcher:

The Basics
Mary Hays McCauley (McKolly or McCalla or McCawley or McAuley) was born c1753 and married William Hays. William was a gunner in Proctor’s 4th Artillery at the Battle of Monmouth during the American Revolution, and Mary, like many women, followed her husband to war. After the War, William, Mary, and their 3-year-old son, John L. Hays, settled in Carlisle purchasing lot #257. William entered the barbering business. William died in 1786 and by 1793 Mary married John McCalla, who dies or disappears by 1810. In 1822 Mary Hays McCauley applied for a pension from the State of Pennsylvania and was granted a yearly $40 pension by special act of the PA legislature. The initial bill, Senate No. 265, was entitled “An act for the relief of Molly McKolly, a widow of a soldier of the Revolutionary War.” Striking “widow of a soldier” and inserting “for services rendered” was a deliberate change to the bill and Mary thus received the pension in her own right. Molly and her son continued to live in Carlisle until her death in 1832. Mary Hays McCauley is referred to as Mary, Molly, and Polly in various tax and other records. Although oral accounts have been passed down that Mary Hays actually took her husband’s place at the cannon after he was injured at the Battle of Monmouth, there is no documentation – as yet – that she really did this.

Mixing it up
Also in Cumberland County at the time of the Revolutionary War, just north of Chambersburg,
(now Franklin County) was Mary Corbin. Known as Captain Molly, she fought at the Battle of Washington in 1776 and documentation verifies her firing a cannon and being wounded during that battle. She also received a pension in her own right. She is buried at West Point.

Was she the original Molly Pitcher?
FYI: Other women were also granted pensions for their services during the American Revolution by special act of the PA Legislature.

Does it matter?
Whether Carlisle’s Mary Hays McCauley or Margaret Corbin, visiting the Molly Pitcher Monument in Carlisle’s Old Graveyard is worth the visit to pay respects to all women who followed their loved ones to war and made heroic sacrifices in the cause of Independence – on and off the field of battle.

Compliments of Carlisle Guided Tours * Walking Tours of Carlisle * (717) 249-2926 (Not sure if they are in business now)

References:
Thompson, D.W. and Schaumann, Merri Lou. “Goodbye, Molly Pitcher,” Cumberland County History, Vol. 6, Number 1, Carlisle, PA, Cumberland County Historical Society,1989.

Echman, Walter. Program script on the history of the Carlisle Carpet Co., 1964.

Hoffer, Ann Kramer. Twentieth Century Thoughts-Carlisle: The Past Hundred Years, Carlisle, PA, Cumberland County Historical Society, 2002.